2017 My School Student Surveys

2017 My School Student Surveys

All students in grades 3-12 are encouraged to participate!

Directions: Click on your school name to visit the survey website for your school.

* To find your school faster, type your school name in the search box directly above the table.


SCHOOL
Bosse High School
Caze Elementary School
Cedar Hall Community School
Central High School
Cynthia Heights Elementary School
Daniel Wertz Elementary School
Delaware Elementary School
Dexter Elementary School
Evans School
Fairlawn Elementary School
Glenwood Leadership Academy
Harper Elementary School
Harrison High School
Hebron Elementary School
Helfrich Park STEM Academy
Highland Elementary School
Lincoln School
Lodge Community School
McGary Middle School
New Tech Institute
North High School
North Junior High School
Oak Hill Elementary School
Perry Heights Middle School
Plaza Park International Prep Academy
Reitz High School
Scott Elementary School
Stockwell Elementary School
Stringtown Elementary School
Tekoppel Elementary School
Thompkins Middle School
Vogel Elementary School
Washington Middle School
West Terrace Elementary School
EVSC Virtual Academy

Here’s how to connect your phone to the school wireless

Here’s how to connect your phone to the school wireless

The school wireless network has been designed to allow for all EVSC students and staff to connect their personal devices to the Internet.

Simply attach to the “EVSC-Secure” wireless network and use your Window’s login credentials to attach.

Some students have configured their devices for EVSC-Staff or EVSC-Student.  These networks are designed for EVSC devices only. Be aware that any non-EVSC devices on these networks will be blocked and not allowed back on the network.

Please assist us with providing the best school wireless experience we can for your school!

Thanks,

Office of Technology

Experiencing issues with Google or YouTube?

Experiencing issues with Google or YouTube?

Google and YouTube Error ScreenWhat’s going on with Google and YouTube?

Students and teachers recently reported an issue with Window’s devices when visiting Google websites using Google Chrome browser.  This was affecting Gmail, Drive, YouTube, and other Google sites.  When visiting these sites, they were presented with an error message instead of the website.  (see pic right)

There’s now a fix!

Technology Support has resolved the issue and has pushed out a software update for all Window’s computers.  To get the update, students and staff need to restart their computers while at school.  Please do this at a time when it’s convenient to leave the computer turned on.

To restart your computer, click on the Window’s Start button and then choose Restart in the bottom-right of the menu.

PLEASE NOTE: If you haven’t restarted your computer in a while, please be prepared for extended wait time during the restart process to install all the updates that may be available for your computer.  
Please do NOT hold down the power button on your computer to interrupt the update process as this can cause major issues that may require Technology Support to have to reimage your computer (erase your stuff?) to fix the problem.

You will NOT receive the update if you restart…

  • Holding down the power button and then starting up the computer.
    • This does not allow for your computer to install the update as part of the startup sequence.  Please note that sometimes restarting while here at school can be slow if there are many updates for your computer.  That’s why it’s important to restart your computer once or twice a week to minimize the wait time.
    • If you’re having trouble shutting down or restarting your computer, please see a teacher to let you visit your building Technology Support person.
  • Close the lid on your computer and then log back in again.
    • This is not a restart.  Your computer is just asleep with the computer door locked waiting for your username and password to unlock it again.  Your computer has to fully shut down and start back up again to install the update.
  • Restarting your computer at home.
    • We can only issue updates that fix issues related to the internet and software when you restart using the school’s internet.  If restarting is slow, restart first thing in the morning when you get to school. This will allow the process to complete so you’re ready to go when class starts.
How to Troubleshoot Your Lenovo ThinkPad

How to Troubleshoot Your Lenovo ThinkPad

Here’s some quick tips you can use to troubleshoot issues that may occur with your Lenovo ThinkPad.

  1. Restart your ThinkPad
    • Did you know? – If you restart your ThinkPad at school, your computer receives important software updates and fixes for common issues with software and Internet. We are not able to push out fixes while you’re at your home so it’s essential that you restart your computer at school at least once a week.
    • Don’t be surprised… – You may need to restart your computer a couple times to receive all software updates especially if you haven’t restarted your computer at school for a while.
  2. Ask a teacher or school administrator for assistance.
  3. Take it to the office or your school tech office for further assistance.
    • Find out where you are to take your ThinkPad when restarting doesn’t work.

More Quick Tips…

Battery will not charge AND the computer does not say that it needs to be replaced.

Try disconnecting the charger 2-pieces (the cord that plugs into the rectangular block piece) and put them back together again.  Sometimes this often fixes the issue.

What do I do if my battery needs to be changed?

Bring your ThinkPad to the school’s Tech Office to get a new battery.

The mute light is on or you’re not able to control the volume with the buttons at the top.

Part of the fix that we had to put in place for last year’s ISTEP test caused those buttons to no longer work.  To control the volume you will need to use the volume control down by the clock in Windows.

 

The Scoop on High School Student Passwords

The Scoop on High School Student Passwords

All EVSC high school students were prompted to change their computer passwords when they first signed into their ThinkPads this school year. As a result, student passwords for Gmail, Google Apps, and itslearning changed to match this newly set password as entered by the student.

Students need to be aware of this fact when attempting to sign in to Gmail, Google Apps, and/or itslearning. Simply using the student ID number as the password for these programs will not work if the password was changed to something different upon first sign on to the ThinkPad.

How do I change my password?

Click on Change Password

Click on Change Password

To change your password, simply press the Ctrl, Alt, and Delete keys at the same time to launch the Windows Lock Screen.

Next, click the Change Password button and then follow the prompts to enter your username, old password, and the new password (entered twice).

Once you finish entering in all your information, click the arrow button to save the changes.

Remember that once you do this, your password has changed on your computer, Gmail, Google Apps, and itslearning.

Enter your username, old password, and new password (twice) and then click the arrow button to save.

Enter your username, old password, and new password (twice) and then click the arrow button to save.

Laptop insurance available for purchase to protect against theft and vandalism

Laptop insurance available for purchase to protect against theft and vandalism

Worth Ave. Group is pleased to offer a discount to members of EVSC to insure school-issued laptops given to students and faculty. Insurance with Worth Ave. Group will protect the device against: Theft, Fire, Flood, Natural Disasters, Power Surge and Vandalism. This insurance policy will provide full replacement cost coverage and will protect the item worldwide (on and off school grounds). There is no limit to the number of claims that can be filed during the term of the policy and the policy is transferable to a replacement unit.

For more information or to purchase the insurance, download the form below.

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 5- Talent

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 5- Talent

digitalheroism2-talent-cropped-featuredWhat digital skills should every student have to be ready for their future? No matter what you want to do after high school, digital skills have become a necessity. Try to think of a career where some kind of digital skills aren’t needed!

You may have years before you’re finished with school, or you may be graduating in the new few months, but I bet you have used technology to communicate, create something, or collaborate with someone else. Which do you think is the most important? Here’s a hint – the answer is all of them!

The ability to communicate, create, and collaborate with others is a lifelong skill you will need no matter what you want to be when you grow up. You need to be able to do these things when you work with people face to face AND online. You need to practice these skills, just like you would practice to become better at a sport or a hobby. Are your teachers giving you plenty of opportunities to do this?

Here are some ideas of ways you can practice your “digital 3”:

  1. Collaborate – what about collaborating on a Google Doc? A Google Slides presentation? Have you ever used Google Keep? It’s a handy notetaking tool that you can use collaboratively with a classmate.
  2. Create – Do you love creating posters, signs, and other images? You should definitely try out Canva.com. If you’re looking for a really fun presentation tool you should check out Powtoon!
  3. Communicate – Have you ever had a teacher use KidBlog? It’s a great way for you to communicate your learning and share those awesome things you’re creating too!

Remember, the time for you to begin getting good at these 3 important digital skills is NOW! They’re great digital skills not only to use in school, but in life!

Kyle Pace, an Instructional Technology Specialist, has worked with K-12 teachers in his current school district to provide instructional technology professional development for the last 11 years with prior experience in the elementary classroom. Kyle currently holds a Master of Arts degree in Education with an emphasis in Educational Technology. Kyle champions to support teaching and learning with meaningful technology integration using a multitude of technologies. Kyle is a keynote speaker and presenter at education conferences such as ASCD, EdTechTeam’s Google Apps for Education Summits, Learning Forward, ISTE, FETC, Staff Development for Educators, and individual school districts around North America. Kyle has also organized all five annual EdcampKC “unconferences” since 2010. As part of his ongoing commitment to professional growth, Kyle is also a Google Certified Teacher. In January 2013, Kyle was named as one of Education Week’s 2013 “Leaders to Learn From” and joined the other honorees in Washington, D.C. to receive recognition from Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan.

Challenge

How do you collaborate, create and communicate in your daily life? How can you use these skills more?

How to Comment

At the bottom of each day’s post, you will find a dialog box for leaving a comment. When you click in the comment box, you will be asked to supply a name and email address. Use your first name and your EVSC gmail address ([email protected]).

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Only students who provide their name and EVSC email will have their comments posted. Comments will be screened before going live on the blog – this might take a little time, be patient, they will appear.

We are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 4- Respect

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 4- Respect

digitalheroism2-respect-croppedIs Social Media the Mirror to YOUR Soul?

We talk a lot about respect on my team at EVSC.  It’s a big concept.  Most agree that you can have respect for people that you have never met or places that you have not experienced first-hand.  But, this respect often stems from your perceptions, or ideas that you have based on the world around you.  Perceptions are often formed based on the world around us, the opinions of others and how you may agree or disagree with them.   One common place you see the information that helps form your perceptions is through social media.

The leaders in the EVSC also discuss respect as it relates to other broad concepts such as value (the worth of something) and relevance, (usefulness to us as it relates to something else). I believe that we tend to value people and places based upon the relevance they have to us.

So, in a world where there is nearly instant feedback available via social media, has respect simply become a matter of perceptions that have been formed – rather than on facts?

I often wonder if the posts and comments we make on social media have more to say about ourselves than we realize.  Those that react to something they have read instantly, without investigation or thought, can only be reacting based on the perceived relevance of the subject matter to them.

As an example, let’s look at the recent conversations on social media regarding the proposed snow make up days.  There were many students and parents who commented within less than five minutes about how they would not participate in any of the options available to the EVSC because of one thing or another that was happening in their lives.  That is a reaction based on relevance.

From the EVSC’s perspective, the decision that would be made would need to be based on what will help students the most educationally – not just to comply with the law.  That is EVSC’s relevance to the subject matter.

So, could we indeed say that often times postings and comments on social media are only a reflection of the relevance of the subject matter to the individual?

Should writing with respect for the subject matter – or the person behind the subject matter be factored in?  Is that important?

What do you think?

Dr. David B. Smith was named Superintendent of the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation on June 20, 2011, and officially began his tenure July 1, 2011. Smith has served in the EVSC for the previous 32 years in a variety of roles from instrumental music teacher for 19 years, to principal, deputy superintendent, director of principal support, and deputy chief of staff, until his most recent position prior to the superintendency — as assistant superintendent for business and human resources.  Among his honors and recognitions related to teaching, he was the Evansville Courier & Press/University of Evansville 1992 High School Teacher of the Year and was nominated several other times for the award for teaching, as well as for administration.   Also, while instrumental music teacher at Reitz, he grew the instrumental program to more than 350 students, reaching the pinnacle as state finalists 12 times. He holds the degree of Doctor of Education in Leadership from Oakland City University, and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music education from the University of Evansville. He also has a degree in Secondary Administration and Supervision as well as an Education Specialist degree from Indiana State University.  Most recently, Smith received his Master of Business Operational Excellence degree and Lean Six Sigma black belt designation in December 2011 from The Ohio State University, Fisher College of Business.

Challenge

Tell us what you think! Are postings and comments on social media only a reflection of the relevance of the subject to the individual? Should we consider respect for subject matter or the person behind the subject matter when we post? Is this important?

How to Comment

At the bottom of each day’s post, you will find a dialog box for leaving a comment. When you click in the comment box, you will be asked to supply a name and email address. Use your first name and your EVSC gmail address ([email protected]).

Screen Shot 2015-03-01 at 5.03.37 PM

Only students who provide their name and EVSC email will have their comments posted. Comments will be screened before going live on the blog – this might take a little time, be patient, they will appear.

We are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 3- Kindness

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 3- Kindness

digitalheroism2-kindness-featuredThomas A. Edison said, “If we did all the things we are capable of, we would literally astound ourselves.” Edison’s words were likely said more than a century ago – before anyone could even conceive of how interconnected the world would be today.

How has this connectedness enhanced our capabilities? At a recent conference, a speaker said, “today’s teens have more ability to organize people than a Middle Age king.”

Today’s students can connect instantly, with people of all ages, from anywhere in the world. We can promote understanding, share beautiful moments with others, learn about the hopes and dreams of someone from a different culture, or develop a tool that makes a difference in the lives of others. I have seen countless examples of teens in the world who are already doing each of these things.

How do you want to use technology?

The digital heroes of tomorrow will choose to use technology for kindness. It’s in our DNA, and it’s already in our technologies. The iPhone, iPad, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google, 3D Printing, etc. were all created so we can connect with and learn from each other, find information, improve lives, and indeed, change the world.

To use technology for lesser purposes is to squander the extraordinary opportunity we all have. No other generation has had as much power as yours to change the world. This is not only an opportunity – it is your obligation. You matter. You are a genius, and the world needs your contribution.

Fortunately, your generation understands this far better than those that came before you. You believe in the future. You believe that one person can make a difference. Listening to you speak about the world gives me hope and inspiration.

Protect your optimism because the future demands it. Protect your sense of possibility. Without it, we despair, and it’s hard to change the world from despair. You are more conscious and conscientious than my generation was at your age. You see problems in the world – globally and locally – and strive to understand, learn and discover instead of waiting for others to do something about them.

Technologies won’t change the world. The manner in which we use technology is changing the world, for good.

How will you use technology to change the world?

This post written by Angela Maiers, who writes: I am so glad you found your way into this important conversation about learning, leadership, digital literacy and 21st Century Skills. My life path has always been about teaching and communication. My twenty five years as an educator and my passionate pursuit of literacy and learning, gave me the healthy dose of courage and skills that have led me through a wonderful variety of experiences, including classroom and University teaching, instructional coaching, research, writing, publishing, corporate training, and starting my own business. Through the course of these experiences, I began to use technology in a variety of ways. It was my blog, and now my engagement on Twitter and multiple social networking sites that changed everything for me. There are no limits for learners with passion, foresight, and a desire to grow. Technology, used strategically, has the power to leverage human capital and maximize performance of organizations big and small. I would be honored to take the conversation to the next level. Let’s consider what’s possible. Together We Are Smarter!

Challenge

Explain how you will use technology to change the world.

Bonus

View the following video:

How to Comment

At the bottom of each day’s post, you will find a dialog box for leaving a comment. When you click in the comment box, you will be asked to supply a name and email address. Use your first name and your EVSC gmail address ([email protected]).

Screen Shot 2015-03-01 at 5.03.37 PM

Only students who provide their name and EVSC email will have their comments posted. Comments will be screened before going live on the blog – this might take a little time, be patient, they will appear.

We are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.