EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 5- Talent

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 5- Talent

digitalheroism2-talent-cropped-featuredWhat digital skills should every student have to be ready for their future? No matter what you want to do after high school, digital skills have become a necessity. Try to think of a career where some kind of digital skills aren’t needed!

You may have years before you’re finished with school, or you may be graduating in the new few months, but I bet you have used technology to communicate, create something, or collaborate with someone else. Which do you think is the most important? Here’s a hint – the answer is all of them!

The ability to communicate, create, and collaborate with others is a lifelong skill you will need no matter what you want to be when you grow up. You need to be able to do these things when you work with people face to face AND online. You need to practice these skills, just like you would practice to become better at a sport or a hobby. Are your teachers giving you plenty of opportunities to do this?

Here are some ideas of ways you can practice your “digital 3”:

  1. Collaborate – what about collaborating on a Google Doc? A Google Slides presentation? Have you ever used Google Keep? It’s a handy notetaking tool that you can use collaboratively with a classmate.
  2. Create – Do you love creating posters, signs, and other images? You should definitely try out Canva.com. If you’re looking for a really fun presentation tool you should check out Powtoon!
  3. Communicate – Have you ever had a teacher use KidBlog? It’s a great way for you to communicate your learning and share those awesome things you’re creating too!

Remember, the time for you to begin getting good at these 3 important digital skills is NOW! They’re great digital skills not only to use in school, but in life!

Kyle Pace, an Instructional Technology Specialist, has worked with K-12 teachers in his current school district to provide instructional technology professional development for the last 11 years with prior experience in the elementary classroom. Kyle currently holds a Master of Arts degree in Education with an emphasis in Educational Technology. Kyle champions to support teaching and learning with meaningful technology integration using a multitude of technologies. Kyle is a keynote speaker and presenter at education conferences such as ASCD, EdTechTeam’s Google Apps for Education Summits, Learning Forward, ISTE, FETC, Staff Development for Educators, and individual school districts around North America. Kyle has also organized all five annual EdcampKC “unconferences” since 2010. As part of his ongoing commitment to professional growth, Kyle is also a Google Certified Teacher. In January 2013, Kyle was named as one of Education Week’s 2013 “Leaders to Learn From” and joined the other honorees in Washington, D.C. to receive recognition from Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan.

Challenge

How do you collaborate, create and communicate in your daily life? How can you use these skills more?

How to Comment

At the bottom of each day’s post, you will find a dialog box for leaving a comment. When you click in the comment box, you will be asked to supply a name and email address. Use your first name and your EVSC gmail address (firstname.lastname@evsck12.com).

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Only students who provide their name and EVSC email will have their comments posted. Comments will be screened before going live on the blog – this might take a little time, be patient, they will appear.

We are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 3- Kindness

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 3- Kindness

digitalheroism2-kindness-featuredThomas A. Edison said, “If we did all the things we are capable of, we would literally astound ourselves.” Edison’s words were likely said more than a century ago – before anyone could even conceive of how interconnected the world would be today.

How has this connectedness enhanced our capabilities? At a recent conference, a speaker said, “today’s teens have more ability to organize people than a Middle Age king.”

Today’s students can connect instantly, with people of all ages, from anywhere in the world. We can promote understanding, share beautiful moments with others, learn about the hopes and dreams of someone from a different culture, or develop a tool that makes a difference in the lives of others. I have seen countless examples of teens in the world who are already doing each of these things.

How do you want to use technology?

The digital heroes of tomorrow will choose to use technology for kindness. It’s in our DNA, and it’s already in our technologies. The iPhone, iPad, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google, 3D Printing, etc. were all created so we can connect with and learn from each other, find information, improve lives, and indeed, change the world.

To use technology for lesser purposes is to squander the extraordinary opportunity we all have. No other generation has had as much power as yours to change the world. This is not only an opportunity – it is your obligation. You matter. You are a genius, and the world needs your contribution.

Fortunately, your generation understands this far better than those that came before you. You believe in the future. You believe that one person can make a difference. Listening to you speak about the world gives me hope and inspiration.

Protect your optimism because the future demands it. Protect your sense of possibility. Without it, we despair, and it’s hard to change the world from despair. You are more conscious and conscientious than my generation was at your age. You see problems in the world – globally and locally – and strive to understand, learn and discover instead of waiting for others to do something about them.

Technologies won’t change the world. The manner in which we use technology is changing the world, for good.

How will you use technology to change the world?

This post written by Angela Maiers, who writes: I am so glad you found your way into this important conversation about learning, leadership, digital literacy and 21st Century Skills. My life path has always been about teaching and communication. My twenty five years as an educator and my passionate pursuit of literacy and learning, gave me the healthy dose of courage and skills that have led me through a wonderful variety of experiences, including classroom and University teaching, instructional coaching, research, writing, publishing, corporate training, and starting my own business. Through the course of these experiences, I began to use technology in a variety of ways. It was my blog, and now my engagement on Twitter and multiple social networking sites that changed everything for me. There are no limits for learners with passion, foresight, and a desire to grow. Technology, used strategically, has the power to leverage human capital and maximize performance of organizations big and small. I would be honored to take the conversation to the next level. Let’s consider what’s possible. Together We Are Smarter!

Challenge

Explain how you will use technology to change the world.

Bonus

View the following video:

How to Comment

At the bottom of each day’s post, you will find a dialog box for leaving a comment. When you click in the comment box, you will be asked to supply a name and email address. Use your first name and your EVSC gmail address (firstname.lastname@evsck12.com).

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Only students who provide their name and EVSC email will have their comments posted. Comments will be screened before going live on the blog – this might take a little time, be patient, they will appear.

We are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 2- Originality

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 2- Originality

digitalheroism2-originality-cropped-featuredHi students! My name is Chandra Meibalane, and I am a 2007 graduate of Harrison High School. In 2012, I graduated from Butler University with a degree in Violin Performance and Chemistry. Recently, I moved to Las Vegas to pursue a professional career in music.

Here in Las Vegas, I am a freelance violinist and a middle school orchestra teacher. Freelance means I work for myself, and get hired by different companies. I have performed with artists such as Rod Stewart, Ricky Martin, Santana, and Andrea Bocelli. I perform most often with a girl string group called Bella Electric Strings. We are a group of classically trained musicians who perform rock music like Nirvana, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, and Beatles hits. Bella also performs Top 40 songs that you guys might know, such as  “Happy” by Pharrell Williams and “Wrecking Ball” by Miley Cyrus.

In order to perform music that has already been written and performed by an artist, we have to first secure permission from the copyright owner to use the music. Next we transcribe the music. Transcribe means you listen to the music and write down musically what you hear in the vocal line. After transcribing the melody, we write harmony parts to accompany the melody. Most of the time for Bella, there are four written parts. Two different parts are written for two violins, one part is written for a viola, and one is written for cello. Once each part is written, a track must be recorded, so the musicians have something to play to. A track is the background music you hear that an artist sings or plays along to. Recording our own track is very important because we cannot simply use the track from the original song. That would be an example of violating a copyright law.

After the parts are written and the tracks are recorded, each musician records their own part with the track. After each part is recorded, we can finally perform the piece. These steps go into every piece we play, since most of the songs we play are songs that have already been written for an artist. Following these steps are important in order to create an arrangement that respects the work previously done by others.

Another example of respecting the work of others is when I play for gigs outside of Bella. For example, if I am asked at a gig to perform “Happy,” I cannot perform the same arrangement as the one I play in Bella. I could, however, ask for permission prior to the gig to use Bella’s arrangement. Examples like these are instances I never would have thought of in high school let alone a couple of years ago. It is important, just like when you are writing a paper, to always give the author, or in my case the composer, credit. When you’re performing a piece, ask yourself, “Does the audience have a program which states the piece and composer I am playing?”  “If I’m arranging a piece, do I have the original composer written down?” “If I want to perform a piece written by another musical group, do I have their permission?”

Chandra Meibalane is a 2007 graduate of Harrison High School and a 2012 graduate of Butler University with a degree in Violin Performance and Chemistry. She now resides in Las Vegas, NV where she is a freelance violinist and a middle school orchestra teacher. She has performed with artists such as Rod Stewart, Ricky Martin, Santana, and Andrea Bocelli.

Challenge

Explain why respecting the artistic work of others is important. How do you respect the artistic work of others? What kinds of artistic works does copyright apply to? Did you realize that respecting the artistic work of another artist can be shown by the attention to detail you put into your own arrangements or remixes? And finally, do you need to secure copyright permission to make a remix of a copyrighted work? What do you think?

Important

Please know that single word answers or answers that do not provide a substantial answer to the challenge question(s) posed will not count as entries for the tablet drawing. If yesterday you posted a reply like this return to the Day 1 post and reply to your original answer with more detail. You may notice a reply from a member of the EVSC iTeam asking for more information. Please reply! Remember, we are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.

Bonus

View the following video:

Professor Eric Faden of Bucknell University created this humorous, yet informative, review of copyright principles delivered through the words of the very folks we can thank for nearly endless copyright terms.

Creative Commons License

How to Comment

At the bottom of each day’s post, you will find a dialog box for leaving a comment. When you click in the comment box, you will be asked to supply a name and email address. Use your first name and your EVSC gmail address (firstname.lastname@evsck12.com).

Screen Shot 2015-03-01 at 5.03.37 PM

Only students who provide their name and EVSC email will have their comments posted. Comments will be screened before going live on the blog – this might take a little time, be patient, they will appear.

We are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 1- Creativity

EVSC Digital Heroism Challenge- Day 1- Creativity

creativity-characterCreativity Makes the World a Better Place – Don’t you Want a Better World?

There is nothing I enjoy more in life than creating something new.  For me this could be cooking an amazing dinner, penning a great blog post (like this!) or my true passion creating innovative and fun products like Storyboard That or Photos for Class.
As a good digital citizen by sharing your creations with the world you make a better, richer, fuller Internet for everyone!

Why Create?

When you create something you get to use everything you have ever learned, mix it with your ideas and passions, and research what you are most curious about.
Think about the last time you drew a picture and it started with a single line, wrote a poem based off a single word, or took that amazing photo?  What did you learn? How happy did it make you feel?  Did you know you could do it?

How excited were you to share it?

Why Share

When you share your creations, that you poured your heart and soul into, you grow stronger and stronger and give enjoyment to others.  For me there are three big reasons I like to share, two are selfishly for my benefit, and one for everyone else.

  1. People love to look at other people’s work – When you create something new and original it lets everyone see a new way to look at something and inspires others to explore their own passions and dreams.
  2. It feels good to be recognized for your work – I’ll admit it, I like when people like what I built.  Who doesn’t like it when they share on Facebook and get 50 Likes?
  3. (Most Important) Listening to and improving based on feedback – when people let you know what they think of your work (both good and bad) it gives your valuable knowledge and ideas on how to make your next creation even better.

How this Makes the World a Better Place

Since the web came out in 1989 people from around the world have poured their hearts and souls into creating and sharing the technology and content we use every day.   As of 3/8/15 Wikipedia has 4,737,299 articles in English, Flickr has ~5 billion of photos, and there are around 1.2 billion websites.  Storyboard That has seen over 700,000 storyboards created!
As a digital citizen you get to do your part and build out the future of the internet and the content and products we will be using in the future.

Why Storyboard That and Photos for Class?

I created Storyboard That to help increase creativity in myself and others.  By being able to quickly create storyboards and graphical organizers authors (like you) are empowered to explain a new idea, make a YouTube script, or bring a homework assignment to life.  After the storyboards are created the creator can share with others to receive feedback and make it better and better!
Photos for Class is my second website to increase creativity.  Fast access to gorgeous photos make reports and presentations more exciting and inspiring.  The more exciting a project the more creativity that gets poured in, making it more exciting, creating a wonderful output!

Last Thought and a Challenge

If you had one week alone with a computer, a camera and some pizza what would you make?

Challenge

  1. Create something unique and original
  2. Share it with the world
  3. Listen to the feedback – and don’t get upset!
  4. Make something better and go back to step 2
Article by Aaron Sherman, Founder, StoryBoard That – Mr. Sherman has a BS in management and an MS in Computer Science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). He worked for 9+ years in both technology and marketing across the globe in Boston, Barcelona, and Sydney. He brings to the table a powerful vantage point of common problems regardless of location and an astute understanding of communication opportunities.

How to Comment

At the bottom of each day’s post, you will find a dialog box for leaving a comment. When you click in the comment box, you will be asked to supply a name and email address. Use your first name and your EVSC gmail address (firstname.lastname@evsck12.com).

Screen Shot 2015-03-01 at 5.03.37 PM

Only students who provide their name and EVSC email will have their comments posted. Comments will be screened before going live on the blog – this might take a little time, be patient, they will appear.

We are looking for comments that add to the conversation and make us think. Feel free to ask the author of the post questions, add your own ideas and resources, and share your experiences related to the topic.